What Happens to your E-Waste?

As our world becomes more tech-savvy, outdated devices are often thrown away. Many of these items have valuable components that can be recycled and reused for many years to come. This is why the e-waste management business is bigger than ever. In a recent Earth911.com post, they say, "It’s not a glamorous business, but it is a growing one. The U.S. generates about 3 million tons of electronic waste annually, yet recycles just 15 percent. More states are expected to pass or strengthen e-waste...

ComputeReach Receives the 'Community Champion Award'

Last night we attended the 17th Annual Child Abuse Prevention Month Awards and Appreciation Benefit, and were honored to receive the 'Community Champion Award!' Here are some pictures of the award: And some of our information, featured in the event's pamphlet: When the goal for the day is getting enough food for the children in your care, the possibility of a computer purchase becomes distant or impossible. Years go by, children continue to fall behind in learning how to use computers in their...

The Street Academy in Accra, Ghana: Part 1

We recently had the privilege of helping an academy in Ghana get up-to-date with some new laptops. Here's the story: Background The Street Academy (www.thestreetacademy.webs.com) received 5 Linux Edubuntu laptops from ComputeReach and its partners at the very end of March 2012. This was possible thanks to the generous donation of our laptop sponsor, Mike Gable, as well as the hard work of the volunteers who refurbished the laptops. They were transported into Ghana from the US by way of carry-on luggage. The Street Academy uses education, culture, and sports to expose the hidden talents of children living on the streets...

ComputeReach in India

This is a picture of ComputeReach giving computers to our staff at an orphanage in Churachandpur, Manipur, India. It's in the northeast corner of India, east of Bangladesh and just west of Myanmar. From left to right is Don Vice from Lafayette, IN; Leslie Swensen of Churchill, PA; R. Sang, from India; R. Ruata, the superintendent of the orphanage; and Englian Valte, the supervisor of the children. Thanks to all the hardworking volunteers and our partners in India for making this project such a...

The Earth Is Full

TED Talks is a daily video podcast where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes. It's one of the best resources out there for any forward thinker. This video especially hit home for us as we are always trying to reduce waste and salvage the resources we do have. Let us know what you think in the comment box below. Have we used up all our resources? Have we filled up all the livable space on Earth? Paul Gilding suggests we have, and the possibility of devastating consequences, in a talk that's equal...

ComputeReach Honored as Jefferson Award Finalist

On April 19th, ComputeReach had the honor of being a finalist for the 2012 Jefferson Awards for Public Service. The six finalists were presented during the ceremony, and the winner became Pittsburgh's nominee for the national Jacqueline Kennedy Onasis award. Here's some more information about the award: In 1972, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Senator Robert Taft Jr., and Sam Beard founded the American Institute for Public Service to establish a "Nobel Prize" for public and community service. The mission of the Jefferson Awards is to honor Americans who perform outstanding public service and inspire others to follow their example. The Jefferson Awards are...

Bedford Dwellings BJWL Gets a Mac OS9 Update

Last Saturday, we rallied a team of three volunteers to refresh the OS9 iMac lab of eleven computers in the Hill District section of Pittsburgh. For the last month we've been slowly making our way back to the few BJWL sites that do not have Mac OS X or Edubuntu Linux installed, but rather a 2002 version of the Classic Mac OS 9.2.2. This was a great operating system, but it's outdated for today's use and not suitable for the web. However, the old operating system was great for younger children and robust enough to run WikiPedia for Kids completely...